LightSource Podcast Interview Series

E039 Jason Berger

In this edition of LightSource, Bill and Ed talk with headshot photographer Jason Berger.

Hosts:

Bill Crawford, publisher of StudioLighting.net (Flickr)
Ed Hidden, exclusive IStockPhoto.com photographer (Flickr)

Special Guest:

Jason Berger, New York City headshot photographer.

Jason Berger

Jason Berger Photos


LightSource Episode 39 (Interview Series) [43:45 minutes]

 

 

LightSource E038 [19.7 MB]Download this episode


In this episode:

Bill and Ed discuss:

Special Guest Jason Berger discusses:

  • His unique headshot approach
  • How he defines a headshot
  • Location versus studio lighting
  • What lighting gear he uses most
  • How to use a large diffusion curtain
  • Using a beauty dish
  • Getting started in photography
  • advice for new headshot photographers
  • using three quarter length shots in a portfolio
  • common lighting scenarios
  • black and white versus color images for portfolios
  • retouching rules for headshots
  • makeup for headshots
  • tips for connecting with your subject
  • strange stand ins
  • favorite pieces of equipment

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9 thoughts on “E039 Jason Berger

  1. VP

    I love your podcast. It has opened my eyes to very fine photographers working these days.

    But, there’s one thing that bugs me while listening to the interviews. Too often while the interviewee is talking, you say something along the lines of “wow”, “wow that’s awesome”, “wow that’s cool” . It doesn’t sound very professional. I know you guys are not pro interviewers, but my advise is – if you don’t gave anything to say, don’t say anything.

  2. Debbi

    Another question I forgot to ask. When you give a model a CD in exchange for shooting her/him, do you give them a Photoshopped and sized image? Or what? Most models don’t know much about Photoshop. Maybe you could ask the next Pro Photographer, also wouldn’t you get the model release signed BEFORE the shoot?
    Debbi

  3. Brad

    Here’s one from the other side: You guys just be yourselves. I feel like I’m having a conversation with your guests when I tune in, and I really enjoy the laid back, chatty atmosphere. You do a really good job of asking questions, getting clarification, and moving on when the question’s been answered, all while maintaining an easy-going attitude.

    If I was at the calibre of your guests, yours is the kind of show I’d really enjoy being a part of! You’ve set the conventions, and you’ve got a lot of fans. Keep it up!

  4. Debbi

    I almost wish it were live (your interview, so we could ask questions)..I just listened again and realized Jason was shooting with a 7 year old digital camera. SEVEN YEARS??? I would have asked if the shutter was ever replaced.
    I also love the chatty atmosphere and the ‘wow’, and ‘that’s awsome’…I’m usually saying that here at home too.
    Debbi

  5. Raphael Freeman

    On the subject of backing up pictures, may I suggest a very solution that is relatively inexpensive and works.

    The site is called phanfare, http://www.phanfare.com, and actually it’s a photosharing site. However, the way it works is that it uploads the high quality pictures onto the site and therefore acts as a backup. You don’t actually have to display any of the pictures. All the pictures are backed up, loreses are produced on the fly for viewing and if you ever leave the service they will send you DVDs with your pictures!

    I have on several occasions got confused as to where a photoshoot was and accidentally deleted from my computer. I went to the web, downloaded the entire album of 500 pictures and was back to work!

    Since the incentive is to show off your pictures (rather than backup which is boring), it’s more likely you’ll do it. I make my Dad put all his pictures onto the site precisely to make sure that they are all backed up. Of course, you can then order images to develop directly from the site etc etc.

    The space is unlimited, the forums are awesome, it’s really something that you should recommend to your listeners.

    If you want to check it out, you can get a free account which expires after 1 month. No billing or credit card information is necessary when signing up, only if you decide to continue with it.

  6. Jeff

    Love your podcasts but there’s something i don’t understand with this episode. and it’s a bit misleading and confusing.

    Jason said he uses a Olympus c3030 with anti-dust? what camera is that? and he changes lens and not the images are clean? I don’t know what camera he is talking about since the c3030 is just an advanced point and shoot.

    Clariifications?

  7. Jason V

    “wow that’s cool” – I now say it in my head slightly before or at the same time. It’s part of the local color. Don’t change!

    Also, you guys come up with some wicked questions! It’s amazing how you seem to pull some information out of some of your interviews that otherwise would remain a mystery for us.


SANEI SAMOCA 35 LE, 50/2.8 D. EZUMAR, BOXED, BAD SHUTTER, AS-IS/cks/188716 picture
SANEI SAMOCA 35 LE, 50/2.8 D. EZUMAR, BOXED, BAD SHUTTER, AS-IS/cks/188716
SAMOCA 35 III FILM CAMERA 35MM RANGEFINDER 50mm F3.5 C. EZUMAR LENS WORKS  picture
SAMOCA 35 III FILM CAMERA 35MM RANGEFINDER 50mm F3.5 C. EZUMAR LENS WORKS
Samoca 35mm III Camera Ezumar Anastigmat Lens (E4R) picture
Samoca 35mm III Camera Ezumar Anastigmat Lens (E4R)
SAMOCA 35 III FILM CAMERA 35MM RANGEFINDER 50mm F3.5 C. EZUMAR LENS WORKS JAPAN picture
SAMOCA 35 III FILM CAMERA 35MM RANGEFINDER 50mm F3.5 C. EZUMAR LENS WORKS JAPAN
SANEI SAMOCA 35 LE, 50/2.8 D. EZUMAR, BOXED Super Rare In This Shape picture
SANEI SAMOCA 35 LE, 50/2.8 D. EZUMAR, BOXED Super Rare In This Shape