100 Tips in 100 Days Part 2: Shooting in Wide Aperture

100 in 100 Part 2

In low light, you need to use wide aperture because it allows you to use a faster speed, thereby lessening the risk of blur due to camera shake.

A wide aperture also lets you choose a lower ISO setting that usually results in higher image quality. Plus, the narrow depth of field of a wide aperture setting can draw attention to your subject by blurring the foreground and background.

There are drawbacks, however, in using a wide aperture, and these are explained by Mason Resnick in Adorama’s 100 in 100 Part 2, a collection of practical photography tips which is now on its second series.

[Via: Adorama.com]

Chris Malinao

About Chris Malinao

Chris teaches Lightroom as workflow software to photography students at the FPPF, Federation of Philippine Photographers Foundation. He also teaches smartphone photography.

Vintage Nikon Nippon Kogaku NIKKOR-S.C Lens 1:1.4 / f=5cm -- #3311931 picture
Vintage Nikon Nippon Kogaku NIKKOR-S.C Lens 1:1.4 / f=5cm -- #3311931
Graflex XL camera with Norita Kogaku Japan Noritar 1:3.5 f=100mm lens picture
Graflex XL camera with Norita Kogaku Japan Noritar 1:3.5 f=100mm lens
RARE Nikon RF rangefinder 5cm f:2, 1.4 lens rear cap Nippon Kogaku Japan
RARE Nikon RF rangefinder 5cm f:2, 1.4 lens rear cap Nippon Kogaku Japan "LQQK"
35MM 35/3.5 TOKYO KOGAKU UV TOPCOR, WITH CASE/165570 picture
35MM 35/3.5 TOKYO KOGAKU UV TOPCOR, WITH CASE/165570
Topcor UV Lens 1:4 F-135mm Kogaku Tokyo Japan-  K Mount picture
Topcor UV Lens 1:4 F-135mm Kogaku Tokyo Japan- K Mount